Common spider bite: Causes, description, Treatment

Skin | General Practice | Common spider bite (Disease)

Common spider bite: Description

A spider bite is an injury caused from the bites of spiders or other closely related arachnids.

A person with a spider bite has an injury to the skin from a spider that may, or may not, contain venom. Spider bites are very common injuries, but actual death from a spider bite is extremely rare.

Many people do not even notice that they are bitten by a spider at the time that the bite occurs. As a known fact spiders are shy, and they will only bite if they feel nervous or threatened. Sometimes, a small pinprick or pinch can be felt, but the first sign that appears after a spider bite is often a raised red welt caused by the bodys reaction to the venom, with a small dot in the middle where the spider bit down.

Some spider bites have a distinctive bulls-eye appearance, with a ring of blanched skin around the bite, surrounded by a raised welt. At the site of the bite, swelling, itching, pain, and redness are common.

Causes and Risk factors

Bites from spiders are most of the time irritating, but not poisonous. Localized swelling and reddening are common and usually pass within a few days. A few spiders are poisonous, notably the black widow and brown recluse (brown fiddler). Bites from these spiders require emergency treatment, especially for children.

However, most spider bites do not pose a medical risk. Even spiders that can cause clinically significant bites cause very little mortality or severe morbidity. Pain from a non-venomous spider bite typically lasts from 5 to 60 minutes while pain from venomous spider bites frequently lasts for more than 24 hours.

Common spider bite: Treatment and Diagnosis

Patients can make themselves more comfortable by icing the site or applying remedies such as which hazel to reduce swelling and itching. It is important to keep a spider bite clean to reduce the risk of infection and ulceration

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